Cheesy Snack Crackers
Baking Soda and Vinegar Experiments

If You Take a Mouse to School

by Laura Numeroff
Illustrated by Felicia Bond 

Going to school has never been more fun! Full of humor and mouse hi-jinks, reading this book will set imaginations in motion dreaming up all the possibilities of what could happen with a little whiskered friend in school.

The text is humorous on its own but the illustrations add to the hilarity of the story and truly bring the adventures to life. Hunting for mouse throughout the pages adds to the fun of this book and takes the reader along through a giggle filled day of school. 

 In this Issue

 

Peanut Butter and Jelly Granola Cups

Peanut Butter and Jelly Granola Bites - If You Take a Mouse to School - Off the Shelf

If you take a mouse to school, he'll ask you for your lunchbox. 

So begins this week's book. And why shouldn't he? Isn't lunch the best part of the school day, with the usual classic Peanut Butter and Jelly Sandwich, some cold milk, and a chocolate chip cookie for dessert? 

We've transformed the classic flavors of a school lunch into packable, portable granola cups that work especially well as an afternoon snack. They include a secret ingredient that adds to the chewy, sweet flavor and adds a healthy vegetable boost to these treats.

Peanut Better and Jelly Granola Cups 

Peanut Butter and Jelly Granola Cups - If You Take a Mouse to School - Off the Shelf 

Young Readers in the Kitchen

Kids can help mash the sweet potato and stir all the ingredients together, scoop the batter into the muffin wells, and top each with jelly and a sprinkle of oats. 

 

Peanut Butter and Jelly Granola Cups

Originally inspired by this recipe.

Ingredients

  • 1/2 cup peeled, cooked, and mashed sweet potato
  • 1/2 cup peanut butter
  • 1/4 cup honey
  • 1 egg
  • 2 cups rolled oats, plus about 1/4 cup for topping 
  • about 1/3 cup any flavor jelly (we used grape)
  1. Heat oven to 350 degrees Fahrenheit. Spray 9 wells of a cupcake pan with nonstick cooking spray.
  2. In a large bowl, stir together mashed sweet potato, peanut butter, honey, and egg. Stir in oats until well combined.
  3. Divide batter among the 9 wells of the prepared pan. Top each cup with about 2 teaspoons jelly. Sprinkle additional oats on top if desired. Tip: Fill the final 3 cupcake wells halfway with water to prevent burning.
  4. Bake for about 15 minutes, until lightly golden at the edges. Remove from oven and allow to cool 5 to 10 minutes before running a knife around edges to loosen and remove from pan.  

 

 

Baking Soda and Vinegar Experiments

One of Mouse’s many adventures during his day at school is a purple, bubbling science experiment. Have some of the same bubbling science fun with your young reader by conducting a very safe baking soda and vinegar experiment that introduces chemical reaction – perfect for budding scientists!

Baking Soda and Vinegar Experiments

Supplies

  • 2 plastic cups
  • baking soda
  • vinegar
  • spoon
  • food coloring (optional)
  1. Pour a small amount of baking soda into plastic cup. Preschool Vinegar Baking Soda Experiment
  2. Pour a small amount of vinegar into the other plastic cup.
  3. Place a few drops of food coloring in the baking soda. (Optional) Baking Soda Vinegar Experiment
  4. Spoon or pour vinegar into the baking soda and observe the reaction!  Baking Soda and Vinegar Experiments - If You Take a Mouse to School - Off the Shelf Baking Soda and Vinegar Experiments - If You Take a Mouse to School - Off the Shelf Baking Soda and Vinegar Experiments - If You Take a Mouse to School - Off the Shelf Baking Soda and Vinegar Experiments - If You Take a Mouse to School - Off the Shelf Baking Soda and Vinegar Experiments - If You Take a Mouse to School - Off the Shelf Baking Soda and Vinegar Experiments - If You Take a Mouse to School - Off the Shelf

Science in the Kitchen 

The same bubbling effect caused by the baking soda and vinegar will happen between baking soda and any acid. Try baking up a loaf of Irish Soda Bread with your young reader. The baking soda reacts with the buttermilk in the same way it did with the vinegar. 

Once the baked bread has cooled, cut slices and observe the air pockets. Discuss how the air pockets are the bubbles created by the vinegar and baking soda in the dough and then baked right into the bread.

 

Related Books: 

  • If You Give a Mouse a Cookie, with activities like Mouse's Chocolate Chip Cookies (shhh...they're whole grain!), and make your own Milk Paint.
  • It's back to school time! Whether you are preparing your young reader for school or not, you will enjoy our Miss Bindergaten Gets Ready for Kindergarten activities, such as Miss Bindergarten's Baked Apples and Painted Self Portraits.

 

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